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Newsletters - the Users' Voice

Please note:

We decided to just include on website the more recent editions of the Users' Voice and only a few earlier ones.. Please feel free to CONTACT US if you want to read the earlier hard copies.

Issue 1: [7 pages]

  • The John Mordaunt Trust - Who, What and Why?
  • First, let's reduce the harm
  • Happy Ending - by Andy

Issue 2: [8 pages]

  • HIV+ ex-user addresses the UNGASS, 1998 (UN General Assembly Special Session on drugs) re the futility and inhumanity of the drug war – the speech by Marsha Burnett
  • A User's Tale - by Jo Leigh

Issue 3: [5 pages]

  • UNGASS II
  • Hit OR miss - by Jude

Issue 4: [6 pages, 285KB]

  • Editorial;We need Unity! - by Andria
  • Letters
  • Fear & Loathing in New Britain by 'Teeny Blair'
  • Not 'Monkeying' Around Anymore - by Washington DC's David Morrison
  • Young People, drug misuse and homelessness - by Tim Meddick

Issue 5:[5 pages, 227KB]

  • Letters
  • Let It Be Me - John Francis of New Delhi's 'Beyond Appearances' User-Group
  • Living with hep C and treatment - by Jim the Plumber
  • 'Tackling Drugs,' ignoring users - by Tom Hood
  • Working in the Field - by Gary Sutton

Issue 6: Editorial: [7 pages, 790KB]

  • Get grateful, become an activist - by Andria
  • Telling it like it is - Andria Efthimiou addresses the Commission on Narcotic Drugs (policy-making wing of UN drug bureaucracy.)
  • The Chill-out room
  • A new beginning - IHRA involves Users big-time at their Geneva Conf.
  • In the beginning was the word, and the word was ignorance - by Lin Scott
  • All we need is truth and time - Imani Woods

Issue 7: [4 pages, 421KB]

  • A Star in the East - drug users organise at Slovenian conference
  • The TRANSFORM interview with founder member, Danny Kushlick
  • AIDS Treatments: getting the knowledge

Issue 8: [4 pages, 907KB]

  • Positive change in Puerto Rico by Nemesio Moreno
  • In memoriam for Joe Magee, 22 and his Ma; poem, "Bear Dancing" by Steve Martin
  • My First Time - Ben Shuttleworth (RIP) attends his 1st drug conference
  • Hep C figuring out the facts..Matt Dolan

Issue 9: [8 pages, 508KB]

  • Don't get carried away; there must be a new [drug policy] approach grounded in commons sense, Ethan Nadelmann, Exec Director of the Drug Policy Alliance teaches a more pragmatic and compassionate way.
  • Me & Mr Nice: UV9 interviews the infamous Howard Marks
  • The AIDS/User movement: an herstory by Andria Efthimiou
  • Breaking down the myths; inspired by Transforms campaign pack, Ritza see a very real potential for change
  • Using drugs can be ok in recovery; Jude gets real about depression

Issue 10: [3 pages]

Issue 11: [10 pages]

Issue 12: [6 pages]

Paul Smyth Satan! Mo Mowlam and Co

Issue 13: [7 page]

  • Editorial: 'It's been a long time coming but i know a change is gonna come' (Otis Redding song title used as editorial title.)
  • Wales to get it's own Y-Llais (user Group). Justin Glover reports
  • Dr David Marjot enlightens. Drug deaths - what really kills drug users..
  • Anonymous academic talks; Living with drugs at work
  • A year on Interferon: Sue Charlesworth, the brave, copes with HCV treatment.

Issue 14: [9 pages]

  • Mr Protest himself gay activist Peter Thatchell speaks out about AIDS and drugs.
  • Matt Dolan gives the low down on HCV treatments when on methadone
  • Vic Hernandez American AIDS researcher and activist keeps us on our toes about AIDS. Thank-God somebody does
  • UK Harm Reduction Alliance 1st conference report

Issue 15: [7 pages]

  • Editorial, Hope Springs Eternal
  • Weary but not sleeping, Peter McDermott, writer and activist
  • The Latins get organised, Andria Efthimiou on the 1st Latin American Harm Reduction conference
  • AMFAR's Dr. Mathilde Krim: AIDS prevention - another History lesson.

Issue 16: [10 pages, 288KB]

  • Editorial: Rebel with a cause, Brian Paddick famous for the Brixton 'experiment' interviewed
  • Liberate the Spirit. UV looks at Spirituality and drugs - Mohammed Sajid
  • Rev. Ken Leech, drugs and spirituality
  • Drugs, no drugs: God's love always the same Rabbi Schacter-Shalomi
  • Maureen Roberts, a pioneering user’s Mum inspires all
  • Cannabis Users Guide;avoiding any adverse affects, by Chris Sanders

Issue 17: [16 pages]

Issue 18: [10 pages]

People have said Ibogaine is ‘hard,’ compared to other healing psychedelics and/or a DEA experimental drug that was not created to help people hooked on ‘dope.’ Still a few drug dependents desperate to stop shooting up swear by its efficacy and are willing to continue risking their liberty – it is still illegal like so many other meds - to access it for themselves and others. Here Randy Faulconer tells why.

I’ve been trying to come off drugs since 1977. It has been a tough row to hoe, partly because half the time I was doing it for someone else: my mom, my wife, my son, and the band I was in and anything else but me. I got busted in ‘77 for being in a drug store after hours. They convinced me that I had a drug problem. I knew that, but I didn’t have any medical insurance at the time. The powers that be saw fit to put me in a residential treatment centre, and being in Lexington KY, the home of the Federal Narcotics Institution, they had just the place for me. It was strict behaviour modification with Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) thrown in to deal with the feelings that came up. It took me three years to get through it.

I learned a lot but it sucked loudly. I was getting high before I graduated from there - a shining example.. Pee tests could be beaten then and so it went for every treatment mode that I could find, or that found me. I would get into a program and promptly try and figure how to get around the not-using-bit, with one exception. AA helped me immensely to stop drinking. I have tried every mode of detox/rehab. there is, I think. I’ve done rapid detox with Naltexone pills in the hospital once: that was a nightmare I’d like to forget, countless detoxes in and out of hospitals and institutions. On to the Methadone, more detox and more Methadone, hepatitis B infection, broken needles and more hepatitis B, until I was told that I had Hep. C and it was escalating fast. More Methadone and this time Interferon treatments to go along with the over all feeling of doom I was feeling already. I figured that this one was going to kill me. They said I was ‘cured’ of the Hep. C but that I had a huge addiction to deal with, alone of course...

That’s when my brother found out about Ibogaine and my Mom poured the information in my lap. What I read sounded too good to be true. I was hooked again, but this time I concentrated all my obsessive energy into finding Ibogaine and doing it. It took a year to nail down the treatment, and if it weren’t for the beautiful people in the underground Ibogaine movement, I would still be looking eating methadone. My guide (person who looks after you through the time you are on Ibogaine) came to my home up in the Catskills. I had been fasting all day.

The test dose hit me right between the eyes. At one point, I was wondering what Earth looked like from space, (my Ibogaine guide had told me to blink if I was scared) so I did. I was floating over a huge field with a redwood tree fallen over in it. The ‘space ship I was in’ took off and I kept looking at that tree as it got smaller real fast then disappeared and we hung just out of gravity at light speed as Earth got smaller and smaller and then went out of view. I had the sensation of moving with it. Others take LSD for this kind of experience: detoxing this way has the added bonus of a few visionary events but the most important reason for taking it is clear. When the going gets tough…

It was the most wonderful thing - except for seeing my son healthy after all the harsh labour my wife went through. I came away from it rewired in a way I can’t explain. I go to meetings, therapy, and I rock – play guitar - every chance I get. I had minor withdrawals afterward but nothing like a real ‘Jones.’ I just don’t sweat the small shit anymore. I’ve seen a bigger picture.

Eds note: We do not recommend anybody seeking a way out of addiction take Ibogaine without some assistance from medical personnel: tests on liver and heart must be done to ensure ‘patient’ is well enough first.

Metaphor For Crack

BY Cliff Seaward

 I was taught the toilet flush metaphor for dopamine depletion metaphor, but have always struggled with it a

it doesn't cover dopamine re-uptake suppression. After spending a

couple of months reading up on current theories of crack/cocaine

brain chemistry I have come up with a new metaphor for what happens in the brain when we use crack and the initial crash after use.

 

Crack Crash Metaphor

 Imagine your brain is a gigantic house in the country, a mansion

or chateau, with a lake out

front and thousands of windows. Now you are living inside your brain

and there is a firework display outside on the front lawn – it’s

is a millennium eve on Sydney harbor bridge; a great firework display. (This is

taking crack)

 

You are amazed as you watch the colors light up all the rooms, with

reds, greens, blues and oranges throwing dramatic patterns of light

and shadow across the walls, gradually your many servants stop what

they are doing and watch the display from all over the House, until

the Head butler realizes just how close the fireworks are and that

there is a danger the house might catch fire.

He barks to the servants to run around and close all the shutters on

the windows and word spreads until all the servants are

furiously slamming shutters closing out the light and protecting the

house.

 

Now if you only ever did crack once the next day the servants would

go around as time permitted with their other chores and open up the

shutters, gradually letting back in the light and beautiful views of

your gardens, lakes, trees, the maze, the vegetable garden, the rose

garden, the streams and waterfalls.

 

If however you have another firework display the next night or later

in the week, the servants now aware of the dangers would

automatically run to shut all the shutters closing them faster and

faster as they got better at this particular job.

>

As the fireworks display become more and more frequent, the

servants decide to leave some of the windows shut, perhaps in distant

dusty wings of the house as you don't go there very often, over time

more and more of the windows are left shut, cutting out the beautiful

views. And if these window shutters are left shut long enough they

get painted over or even bricked up.

>

You are now living in a very dark house with little light and no view,

so the temptation to brighten things up with a firework display is

even greater, but each time you have a display there are less and

less windows to see them through until all the windows are shut,

though some people might still try displays hoping for a peep of

color through the shutters.

>

Cocaine works similarly; its just the fireworks are a little

further away.

 

Now the good news is that when you stop using crack, the servants

will gradually begin to open the shutters, they will make sure there

are no more displays then go around running a knife down the painted

up windows once again giving you the beautiful views you deserve from

your splendid mansion, but this sort of major work takes time - some

windows have been bricked up remember. As the months pass and you

stay away from fireworks(!), more and more windows open and you have more

beauty back in your life though if you let off even one

firework the servants now so well trained will slam the shutters like

clockwork.

 

Getting all your window open again takes time; the

more firework shows you have had the longer it will take, but some

windows will open and the more you walk around enjoying the view the

quicker this will happen but it may take six months, or even nine but

as long as you stay away from fireworks one day all the windows will

be open and your house will be full of sunshine.

Last Updated before: Tue 28-Oct-2008

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